Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Co-funded by Cancer Research UK and Children with Cancer UK, Andi is one of 5 to receive £1 million each to investigate children’s and young people’s cancers.

CRUK Children with Cancer Logo

Professor Andi Roy, Department of Paediatrics, has become one of five researchers to receive the new Cancer Research UK–Children with Cancer UK Innovation Award. It will fund her new project “Developing a new way to treat a type of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) using the immune system”.

Co-funded by Cancer Research UK and Children with Cancer UK, she is one of 5 leaders in their field have been awarded up to £1 million each to delve into the biology of children’s and young people’s cancers, with the hope of finding new ways to prevent and treat these complex cancers.

Despite improvements in overall survival over the last 40 years, cancer remains the leading cause of death by disease in children and young people (aged 1-24) in the UK. Some of these types of cancer continue to have low survival rates and many who survive do so with serious long-term side effects.

A form of ALL known as Mixed Lineage Leukaemia (MLL) gene rearranged infant ALL (MLLr-iALL) has poor survival. CAR T-cell therapy, which uses modified versions of a patient’s T cells to attack their cancer, is often used to treat leukaemia. But using this potentially life-saving treatment in very young patients is limited. This is because it’s very difficult to obtain T cells from them, as these patients have already gone through intensive chemotherapy and are often immunocompromised.

Dr Anindita Roy and Professor Anastasios Karadimitris of Imperial College London, plan to test a new way of treating the disease by adapting this therapy to use a different type of immune cell called invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells that can be taken ‘off the shelf’. They hope this CAR-iNKT cell therapy will be a more effective way of treating these very young patients.

Similar Stories

Population-scale study highlights ongoing risk of COVID-19 in some cancer patients despite vaccination

COVID-19 vaccination is effective in most cancer patients, but the level of protection against COVID-19 infection, hospitalisation and death offered by the vaccine is less than in the general population and vaccine effectiveness wanes more quickly.

Genetic testing could reduce adverse effects and hospital costs of a widely used chemotherapy

Testing for DPYD gene variants could be used to mitigate the side-effects of fluoropyrimidine-based chemotherapy

UK-first cancer operation in Oxford

A UK-first operation that replaced the sternum of a cancer patient using the chest wall of a deceased donor has been carried out at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (OUH).