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OLDSG Logo

The Oxford Lymphoid Disorders Study Group (OLDSG) was launched in September 2020, and brings together a network of researchers and clinicians from across the University of Oxford and Oxford University Hospitals Trust.

At present, around 3-4% of people will develop either lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia (CLL) during their lifetime. Together, lymphoma and CLL represent the commonest blood cancer by some margin.

The purpose of OLDSG is to:

  • to increase the visibility of lymphoid disorder research in the university
  • to foster collaborations between clinicians and laboratory-based scientists leading to high quality translational projects
  • to interact with patients and the public at all levels of project development to deliver research which impacts directly on patient need

Group members work on a range of issues relating to lymphoid disorders, haematology, immunology, molecular diagnostics and late effects research.

OXFORD'S LYMPHOMA WORK

An overview of Oxford's lymphoma research and clinical trials, brought to you by the Oxford BRC

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Population-scale study highlights ongoing risk of COVID-19 in some cancer patients despite vaccination

COVID-19 vaccination is effective in most cancer patients, but the level of protection against COVID-19 infection, hospitalisation and death offered by the vaccine is less than in the general population and vaccine effectiveness wanes more quickly.