Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

Dr Defne Saatci and Professor Julia Hippisley-Cox will develop risk prediction tools using the QResearch database to support the earlier detection of childhood, teenage and young adult cancer

7 hands stacked in a pile

Cancer is the commonest cause of death among children and young people in the UK and is associated with significant long-term morbidity. Unfortunately, the UK lags behind other high-income countries in the time it takes to diagnose childhood, teenage and young adult (TYA) cancer and this delay worsens patient outcomes.

One of the challenges in diagnosing childhood and TYA cancer is its relative rarity and non-specific presentation, and awareness campaigns have been run in an effort to improve recognition of cancer signs among health professionals. Although this resulted in improvements for certain types of cancers in children and TYA, the national time-to-diagnosis targets have still not been reached in all cancers for all age groups.

Dr Defne Saatci and Professor Julia Hippisley-Cox (Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences) have successfully applied for a Cancer Research UK Early Detection and Diagnosis Project Award to accelerate diagnosis of childhood and TYA cancer. They will use the QResearch database, the UK’s largest GP electronic health record database, covering 20% of the UK population and linked to national cancer, hospital and mortality registries. QResearch data will be explored to identify the early symptoms and signs associated with a subsequent diagnosis of the commonest childhood and TYA cancers (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, lymphomas and central nervous system tumours) and this information will be used to develop a risk prediction tool for GP use.

By increasing the understanding about the clinical features associated with childhood and TYA cancers and developing this risk prediction tool for use in primary care, this study aims to make significant advancements in childhood and TYA cancer diagnosis and outcomes.

If you are an Oxford-based researcher thinking of applying for external early detection funding, please get in touch with the OxCODE Scientific Coordinator who can help to coordinate your application.

Similar Stories

Oxford to assess revolutionary multi-cancer blood test in trial, for future implementation in the NHS

A partnership between the University of Oxford and GRAIL, LLC will evaluate the use of a new, non-invasive, multi-cancer early detection test known as Galleri in suspected cancer patients.

Oxford Cancer Analytics awarded £1.27M to revolutonise lung cancer management

OXcan, an Oxford University spin out, has raised money to apply their machine learning approach to lung cancer early detection

Oxford’s cancer-risk research featured in special edition of PLOS Medicine focussed on advances in early cancer detection

Research from Dr Brian Nicholson and colleagues outlines how routine clinical tests could be widely used to estimate the risk of cancer for people visiting their GPs with unexpected weight loss.