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Anna and her team wins the Teamwork award for their work on improving the outcome of children with blood diseases in sub-Saharan Africa

Professor Anna Schuh with scientist in Tanzania

 

Professor Anna Schuh and her team have been announced as the Winners of the Teamwork category in the Vice-Chancellor Innovation Awards 2020 for their work on SEREN: A Social Enterprise to deliver DNA-based diagnostics that improves outcomes of children and young adults with blood diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.

The Vice-Chancellor Innovation Awards celebrate research-led innovation that is having societal or economic impact. Building on the awards two years ago a new category of Policy Engagement has been added to those for Teamwork, Building Capacity, Inspiring Leadership, and Early Career Innovator.

Winners and Highly Commended entries were selected by the Vice-Chancellor’s Innovation Awards panel chaired by Professor Chas Bountra, Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Innovation, and comprising academics from each of the four Divisions and Professional Services staff who support impact and innovation across the collegiate University

You can find out more about the Awards and all of 2020’s Winners and Highly Commended entries on the Vice-Chancellor’s Innovation Awards pages.

 Vice-Chancellor Awards logo

 

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