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University of Oxford Spinouts 'Celleron Therapeutics' and 'Argonaut Therapeutics' will merge to form IngenOx Therapeutics. The new company will focus on delivering new precision medicine drugs and vaccines to treat the most difficult cancers, often referred to as cold tumours.

Nick La Thangue, CEO of IngenOx, and Professor of Cancer Biology at the University of Oxford commented:

“We are very excited by the merger which creates a company with a highly innovative pipeline, a talented and driven management team supported by a balanced group of investor shareholders. This provides the basis for success and future growth. IngenOx has the critical mass to bring a range of novel cancer therapies through clinical development and onwards towards market launch. This is good news for patients, in our continued fight against cancers which remain clinically unmet.”

 Read the full story from Argonaut Therapeutics.

 

 

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