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A generous donation by artist Lida Sherafatmand has seen three prints installed into the Early Phase Clinical Trials Unit at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford.

Lida Sherfatmand with her paintings

Long-time supporter of Worldwide Cancer Research, artist Lida Sherafatmand, has donated three prints to the Early Phase Clinical Trials Unit at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford. Her work is inspired by the healing power of nature and how people flourish when overcoming major challenges in their lives.

There is growing evidence that artwork in clinical environments can have a positive impact on the health and well-being of patients, by reducing anxiety and improving hospital experience.

The artwork has been hung in the Early Phase Clinical Trials Unit (EPCTU), where Lida hopes it will relax patients waiting to undergo treatment. The EPCTU is led by Professor Sarah Blagden, who has a keen interest in understanding ways to improve the patient experience whilst they are participating in clinical trials.

Lida generously donates a portion of her profits to Worldwide Cancer Research – the UK charity that starts new cancer cures. A member of the charity’s Scientific Advisory Committee, Professor Simon Leedham, was delighted to assist when he heard of Lida’s work and quickly put her in touch with the Early Phase Clinical Trials Unit at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford.

Below: Two of the three prints donated to the EPCTU. Thus far the paintings have been noted by patients and staff to have a calming presence.
Lida's print in a bay Lida's painting in a second patient bay

Accepting the artwork, Professor Sarah Blagden, Oncology Consultant at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust & University of Oxford says:

“Hospitals can be intimidating places and we are always looking for ways to improve patient experience. An important aspect of this is the atmosphere on our Clinical Trials ward. We are very grateful to Lida for kindly donating her beautiful artwork.”

Lida Sherafatmand, fine artist and donator of the prints, says:

“It has been a big dream for me to somehow have my art accompany people during moments when they need some extra strength and support. So, I am immensely joyed to have the work help those undergoing therapy in Oxford. I create these paintings while fully focused with each brushstroke, so to create an image with a strong positive vibe.”

Neil Woodley, Head of Philanthropy and partnerships at Worldwide Cancer Research, says:

“We were thrilled to be able to help Lida get her artwork into a facility where patients and healthcare professionals alike can reap the benefits of her beautiful work. We are so grateful to Lida for her generous donations and for helping us continue to make our ground-breaking research possible. Together, with the help of Curestarters like her, we can end cancer.”

Two nurses with Lida's printTwo nurses with Lida's print

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